Buckhead Bike Share

By February 10, 2018Buckhead Lifestyle
 

Buckhead’s Relay Bike Share program has seen significant adoption since its installment in July 2017. The program expanded to Buckhead as a response to the rise in Millennials seeking employment and residences here. As the central commerical core of Buckhead becomes even more densely populated, you can expect to see more alternate forms of transportation. Between August 1 to October 1, 2017, over 450 rides have been enjoyed in Buckhead.

While Relay has seen significant success in other parts of Atlanta, Relay Bike Share General Manager Julie Wells spoke with Buckhead.com about the bikes’ growing popularity in Buckhead and future plans for the program.

“The program has been a great success. A large part of the success can be attributed to the support of the Livable Buckhead team. They have been instrumental in getting the word out about Relay to Buckhead businesses and residents,” said Wells. “We expect [the number of bikes rented] to steadily rise as people in Buckhead get more familiar with the program and projects like PATH400 and on-street bike lanes are expanded.”

Livable Buckhead has been an important advocate in bringing Relay Bike Share to Buckhead, beginning with facilitating the process of selecting locations for Relay stations and securing all the necessary approvals to get them installed. Livable Buckhead partnered with Relay for the launch events in July to increase visibility for the bikes locally in addition to ongoing promotion of the service today.

“When the city launched Relay we knew that we wanted to bring it to Buckhead as soon as we could. It’s a perfect complement to our programs that encourage people to use commute alternatives, and it’s a great option to explore PATH400 by bike,” said Scott Cantrell, the Community Outreach and Communications Manager for Livable Buckhead.

Cantrell is encouraged by the local response to the program and sees Relay as an exciting new amenity for Buckhead’s residents.

“We have significant buy-in from the property managers where the bikes are located. They are excited to offer bike share as a community amenity,” said Cantrell. “People have been enthusiastic about having bike share as an option in Buckhead, and are really pleased with the ease of using the Relay system offers.”

As Buckhead makes plans to become a more walkable, bikeable neighborhood with a vast array of alternative transportation, Wells sees the Buckhead area’s early success as an indicator of good things to come, including having as much station density as Midtown has seen.

“Relay is looking forward to an expansion in the next year or so!  We will be expanding into new neighborhoods, but one of our focuses will be adding density in existing areas,” said Wells.

Livable Buckhead’s Cantrell echoes similar hopes for the program.

“Relay is just one example of the ways that Buckhead is changing to meet the needs of the people who live and work here every day. More people want options for getting around by bike and on foot, which is the motivation for building PATH400. We’re looking forward to the day that people can hop on a bike and easily ride from Buckhead down to the BeltLine, or north to Sandy Springs and beyond. Relay fits perfectly within the vision for a more bike-friendly Buckhead, and we hope it continues to grow and thrive here,” said Cantrell.

How can Buckhead residents ensure that more Relay stations pop up in the neighborhood? Wells suggests renting a bike, trying it for yourself and telling others how much you love it.

“I would really encourage community members who want more alternative transportation infrastructure in the Buckhead area to speak up, go to community meetings and make your voice heard.”

Interested riders can find more information about the app-based bike share program on Relay’s website and take Wells’s advice about usage:

“There is certainly no time limit, users can enjoy a bike for as long as they like! However, bike share bikes are for all, which means when you lock one up another rider can come along and use the bike.  If you are running in to grab a coffee or run a quick errand, we suggest you use the “hold” feature. When in ‘hold’ a user’s time is still running, but other riders are prevented from using the bike. It’s a neat feature that not many people know about!”

Have you rented a Relay bike? Leave your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.

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